Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

*From a sermon for Misericordias Domini (Second Sunday after Easter) on John 10:11-18*

We have heard His voice in His Word as given by the Spirit. We have heard Him call our names in Holy Baptism and wrap them in His own name. We have heard His promise and in Him we know also His Father. The charge He was given, to save us, He has fulfilled –– whether we are “baby daddys,” “prostitutes,” “Gentiles,” or “racists.” He is good. He is kalos. And He is risen. He is risen indeed. Hallelujah! 

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 168

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

Thus Thomas is invited to see if those marks are real, that is, if this is really Jesus who really died as a sacrifice and is really back from the dead and — and — pay attention sinners! — to se if God has changed. For the perfected bodies of the saints bear no scars, but the risen Lord bears these. Thomas is not directed to look to the Lord’s back marked by the Roman scourge or to His brow to se if there are marks from the thorns. He is pointed to the hands and side, to see what the cross has done to God in the flesh.

Has the cross changed God? Indeed, It has. It left marks.

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 162-163

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

They had thought Him the One. They had thought He would save them, that He would redeem Israel. And now, they thought Him dead. The third day had come. The women had announced strange things. But they were troubled, afraid to believe. They didn’t want to get their hopes up again.

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 156

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

It is because the Passover was the most essential and central of Old Testament events that our Lord lays down His life in the midst of its remembrance. He goes as a lamb to the slaughter, silent, but not without knowledge. He lays down His life as a sacrifice, of His own accord, and He chooses the time. He is the Lamb whose blood shields us from the angel of death and delivers us from the slavery of Pharaoh. He is both the new Adam and the true Israel, and He is the One Who Is.

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 139

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

These two noteworthy characters, Mary of Bethany and Judas, produce a powerful effect by way of contrast. Together they typify our relation to the Christ: He gives His body to Magdalenes to be anointed, and He gives it likewise to Judases to be kissed. He gives Himself to good persons who repay Him with love and service, and He gives Himself to foes who crucify Him. We, of course, have been ––and are––both. We are Mary, and we are Judas. We are saint, and we are sinner.

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 130

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

Palm branches represent an oasis, water and food, rest and shelter in a barren and hostile place. This is what God gives in the temple and in His Word: He gives refreshment, rest, safety. Jesus is the temple build without hands. He abides in the hearts of the faithful. He enters into them through HIs sacrificed, yet risen, body and blood. So the saints in heaven decorate themselves like the temple on earth with palms, for they the are the place of the Lamb’s gracious blood, the temples of the Holy Spirit.

Thy Kingdom Come: Lent and Easter Sermons
David H. Peterson
p. 127