Johann Gerhard on The End Effect of Scripture in Respect to God

With respect to God, the end of Scripture is the salutary knowledge and glorification of God. It is for this purpose that God revealed Himself in His Word that was first spoken orally and later was committed to writing so that He, having been known correctly by human beings according to His essence and will, might be praised in this life and in eternal life. When we recognize from the Word of God His goodness, power, and wisdom and when we meditate devoutly on the mystery of our salvation that has been planned from eternity and revealed in time, that we cannot help but be stirred by that knowledge and meditation into a love for God. From this love there immediately arises in our hearts a celebration and glorification of the supreme good.

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 328

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Johann Gerhard on the authentic text of Scripture

§ 316 …

In De verbo Dei, bk. 2, c. 10, Bellarmine burdens us in this controversy with a double calumny: “(1) That we consider only Luther’s version authentic; (2) that we disagree not a little bith in choosing an authentic Latin version.” However, we claim the Latin or German version of neither Luther nor anyone else as authentic, but only the Hebrew text in the Old Testament and the Greek in the New.

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 282

Johann Gerhard on what the Apocryphal Books of the New Testament teach us

§ 304 Furthermore, this multitude of apocryphal writings that heretics have spread under the venerable names of the evangelists and apostles teach us: (1) About the devil’s great hatred against the sacred writing, who has intended in various ways to gain canonical authority for apocryphal fables and, on the other hand, to bring the sacred, divinely inspired, and truly canonical books into contempt. (2) About the matchless providence of God by which it has happened that the canon of the New Testament was preserved whole and inviolate. Consequently, God granted a long life to St. John so that he might be able to teach the Church about the genuine, canonical books of the evangelists and apostles and to distinguish them from spurious and fictional works. (3) About the devout concern and faithful care of early antiquity in distinguishing apocryphal and spurious books from the canon.

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 271

Johann Gerhard’s first argument that Revelation is canonical

§ 293 But it can be demonstrated with substantial arguments that the Book of Revelation is canonical and was written by the apostle John: (1) From its inscription. The inscription is quite clear: “The Revelation of John the theologian.” It is apparent that the apostle John is that “theologian” par excellence. This is apparent from the conformity of the introduction used in this book with the one used in the Gospel, as well as the one in the first Epistle. The author of this book writes: “Jesus Christ gave this revelation to His servant John, who bore witness to the Word of God and to the testimony of Jesus Christ, even to all that he saw.” (1:1-2). In almost the same way John speaks of himself in his Gospel: “This is that disciple who is bearing word to these things and ho has written these things; and we know that his testimony is true” (21:24). He begins his first Epistle in the same manner: “That which was from the beginning, which we have seen, which we have heard, which we have looked on with our eyes, this we proclaim to you” (1 John 1:1-3).

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 260

Johann Gerhard: Proofs that Jude’s Epistle is Apostolic

§ 288. The following, however, prove that this Epistle is apostolic: (1) The inscription. The author clearly calls himself “Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James.” (2) The subject matter. This Epistle agrees with both the thoughts and words of 2 Peter, of which it contains something like a brief summary and epitome. (3) The testimonies of the ancients. It is counted among the canonical books of the New Testament by the Council of Laodicea, the Council of Carthage, Athanasius, Augustine, and as many of the rest who listed a catalog of sacred books.

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 250

Orthodox Lutheran Father Quote of the Day

The Epistle to the James

(2) “The author of this Epistle calls himself neither an apostle nor the brother of the Lord.” We respond. Paul, too, in his Epistle to the Philippians, both to the Thessalonians, and to Philemon does not call himself an apostle of Christ, but either a servant, which James does also, or he adds nothing. Likewise, John adds the name “apostle” in neither his Epistles nor the Apocalypse. But Jude, too, who was beyond all doubt in the number of the twelve apostles, does not call himself an apostle but only the servant of Jesus Christ and the brother of James. As to why neither Jude nor James calls himself brother of the Lord, the explanation given that they could have appeared to have honored themselves rather than Christ if they had called themselves the brothers of Him whose apostles and servants they were, especially if they were to do this in public, letters written to their churches. In the epistle of Epiphanius to John of Jerusalem, which Jerome translated from Greek to Latin, James the author of this letter, is called in clear words sometimes an “apostle,” sometimes “the brother of the Lord.”

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 250

Orthodox Lutheran Father Quote of the Day

The Epistle to the Hebrews

§ 278. Therefore we show our agreement with this latter position and claim that the Epistle to the Hebrews is (1) a letter of Paul himself; (2) canonical, but it is of the second rank because some people in the Church once had doubts about it; (3) written in Greek.

Johann Gerhard
On the Nature of Theology and on Scripture
p 246