Luther Quote of the Day

For when the serpent, the devil, wanted to effect Adam’s downfall, he set him in particular against the Son, saying: “You will be like God.” That was an offense against the Son of God. Both the devil and Adam wished to dispossess the Son of His honor; for only the Son is like God, or only He is “the image of the invisible God,” as we read in Col. 1:15, and the image of His divine essence, who “bears the very stamp of God’s nature,” as Heb. 1:3 tells us.

Luther’s Works Vol. 15

p 338-339

TREATISE ON THE LAST WORDS OF DAVID
2 Samuel 23:1–7
Translated by MARTIN H. BERTRAM

Ante-Nicene Father Quote of the Day

Bear always in mind that this is the rule of faith which I profess; by it I testify that the Father, and the Son, and the Spirit are inseparable from each other, and so will you know in what sense this is said. Now, observe, my assertion is that the Father is one, and the Son one, and the Spirit one, and that They are distinct from Each Other. This statement is taken in a wrong sense by every uneducated as well as every perversely disposed person, as if it predicated a diversity, in such a sense as to imply a separation among the Father, and the Son, and the Spirit. I am, moreover, obliged to say this, when (extolling the Monarchy at the expense of the Economy) they contend for the identity of the Father and Son and Spirit, that it is not by way of diversity that the Son differs from the Father, but by distribution: it is not by division that He is different, but by distinction; because the Father is not the same as the Son, since they differ one from the other in the mode of their being. For the Father is the entire substance, but the Son is a derivation and portion of the whole, as He Himself acknowledges: “My Father is greater than I.” In the Psalm His inferiority is described as being “a little lower than the angels.” Thus the Father is distinct from the Son, being greater than the Son, inasmuch as He who begets is one, and He who is begotten is another; He, too, who sends is one, and He who is sent is another; and He, again, who makes is one, and He through whom the thing is made is another. Happily the Lord Himself employs this expression of the person of the Paraclete, so as to signify not a division or severance, but a disposition (of mutual relations in the Godhead); for He says, “I will pray the Father, and He shall send you another Comforter…even the Spirit of truth,” thus making the Paraclete distinct from Himself, even as we say that the Son is also distinct from the Father; so that He showed a third degree in the Paraclete, as we believe the second degree is in the Son, by reason of the order observed in the Economy. Besides, does not the very fact that they have the distinct names of Father and Son amount to a declaration that they are distinct in personality? For, of course, all things will be what their names represent them to be; and what they are and ever will be, that will they be called; and the distinction indicated by the names does not at all admit of any confusion, because there is none in the things which they designate. “Yes is yes, and no is no; for what is more than these, cometh of evil.”

Tertullian

Against Praxeas

In Which He Defends, in all Essential Points, the Doctrine of the Holy Trinity

Translated by Dr. Holmes

ch. ix

Note: From this section one can see how Arius and Arianism could find an ally in Tertullian’s writings on the Trinity, especially the distinction he makes between Father and Son. Footnote 7462 says, “In his representation of the distinction (of the Persons of the Blessed Trinity), Tertullian sometimes uses expressions which in aftertimes, when controversy had introduced greater precision of language, were studiously avoided by the orthodox. Thus he calls the Father the whole substance, the Son a derivation from or portion of the whole.” (Bp. Kaye, On Tertullian, p. 505). After Arius, the language of theology received greater precision; but as it is, there is no doubt of the orthodoxy of Tertullian’s doctrine, since he so firmly and ably teaches the Son’s consubstantiality with the Father—equal to Him and inseparable from him. [In other words, Tertullian could not employ a technical phraseology afterwards adopted to give precision to the same orthodox ideas.]

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

Now nothing is so completely in antagonism to God as sin. Ignorance is the counterpart to divine knowledge and wisdom; weakness to divine omnipotence; but sin is set against the very heart and moral glory of God. The ignorant and the weak may be children of God, ad bear his image, but the sinful are sundered from Him by an impassable gulf; though they had the knowledge of an archangel, and a might as near that of God as the creature’s might can be, yet with sin, their image is that of the Devil, and not that of God.

Charles Porterfield Krauth
The Conservative Reformation and Its Theology
p 379-80

Luther Quote of the Day

As the teachers of the Latin language say, there is a vast difference between speaking an idiomatic Latin and speaking a grammatical Latin, so there is also a great dissimilarity between speaking idiomatic Hebrew and speaking grammatical Hebrew. They may speak grammatically, though haltingly, but to speak a pure, good, and fluent Hebrew is no longer possible. Anyone learns German or any other language much better from oral conversation at home, in the marketplace, or from a sermon than he does from books. Written characters form dead words; oral speech forms living words. These do not go into writing as accurately and well as the spirit, or soul, of man can express them orally.

Luther’s Works Vol. 15

p 322

TREATISE ON THE LAST WORDS OF DAVID
2 Samuel 23:1–7
Translated by MARTIN H. BERTRAM

Luther Quote of the Day

Some people worry and wonder whether they are addressing the Person of the Father or the Divine Essence when they pray the Lord’s Prayer. It is not at all surprising that strange thoughts come to a person in this extremely mysterious and incomprehensible article of faith and that occasionally one of these goes away and a word miscarries. But wherever the basis of faith remains intact, such splinters, chips, or straws will not harm us. But the foundation of faith, as we have heard,37 is this, that you believe that there are three Persons in the one Godhead and that each person is the same, one, perfect God, in other words, that the Persons are not intermingled and the essence is not divided but the distinction of Persons and the unity of the essence is preserved. For it is this mystery, of which, as we read in 1 Peter 1:12, the angels cannot behold and wonder their fill in all eternity and about which they are in bliss through all eternity. And if they were able to satisfy their longing, their happiness would end too. We, too, shall behold this, and it will make us eternally blissful, as the Lord says in John 17:3: “And this is eternal life, that they know Thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom Thou hast sent.” In the meanmeantime, faith must cling to the Word, for reason cannot do otherwise than assert that it is impossible and contradictory that there should be three Persons, each one perfect God, and yet not more than one God; that only the Son is Man; that he who has the Father and the Son will surely learn to know the Holy Spirit from the Father and the Son.

Luther’s Works Vol. 15

p 310

TREATISE ON THE LAST WORDS OF DAVID
2 Samuel 23:1–7
Translated by MARTIN H. BERTRAM