Luther Quote of the Day

For the prosperity of Christ, as I have said, is not of this world or of the flesh, but of the spirit. Is there anyone who, while Christ was suffering, would not have thought that He would never become even the lowest of men or live again, much less be King over all things? Who would not have believed then that the meditations of the people were confirmed and not in vain, when they gloried in the fact that they had condemned Him to the curse of the cross by the authority of God Himself and thought that their meditations were secure for eternity? What is more, faith and hope are always necessary in the works of God, requiring not only a submission but an understanding; for His works are fulfilled contrary to all sense and beyond all comprehension.

Psalms 1 and 2 from Words on the First Twenty-two Psalms, 1519-1521A Composite Translation

Psalm 2

Luther’s works, vol. 14:
Selected Psalms III
p 315-316

Luther Quote of the Day

Yet it is possible that someone may say: “There are many saints and martyrs who have left behind neither fruits nor foliage, for all these have been lost with them. Neither do we have all the words of the apostles. How can this praise of the blessed man be a general statement?”

I answer: Their word was not their word; “for it is not you who speak, but the Spirit of your Father speaking through you” (Matt. 10:20). All the saints are taught the same Word; therefore they teach the same Word, just as in 1 Cor. 10:4: “All ate the same food and all drank the same drink.” “But the Word of the Lord abides forever” (1 Peter 1:25), and His truth endures throughout all generations. One can also see that this blessed man and this fruitful tree signifies the whole church or all those who are in the preaching ministry. But there is nothing to forbid the application to every righteous man, for he also has the same leaves. H he does not teach others, certainly he teaches himself, meditating in his heart on the Law of God. This Word also remains eternally in him, just as in the whole church. Finally, since all the faithful are one body, even though this leaf belongs only to the one member who speaks through communion it all belongs to them all. For when I preach, it is my word which my tongue preaches, though I am only the ear and not the tongue. So you should also think about the remaining members and the whole body.

Psalms 1 and 2 from Words on the First Twenty-two Psalms, 1519-1521A Composite Translation

Psalm 1

Luther’s works, vol. 14:
Selected Psalms III
p 302-303

Modern Lutheran Quote of the Day

Fourth: While the text of the Book of Concord has the highest Confessional authentication, and ought not to be changed, except by authority of the Church, it is perfectly consistent with this, that the Editio Princeps be used as an aid in interpreting it. Identical as the two texts are, for the most part, in their very words, absolutely identical in doctrine, we may thank God that we have in the two the historical evidence of the untiring conscientiousness of effort on the part of our Fathers, to give the most perfect form of sound words to the one faith, and that the two texts, so far from disturbing, fix more absolutely that one sense of the Confession, the perception of which is essential to real unity on the part of those who profess to accept it. 

Charles Porterfield Krauth
The Conservative Reformation and Its Theology
p 360

Luther Quote of the Day

20. May this be the reward of My accusers from the Lord, of those who speak evil against My soul!

The prayer in this psalm is answered. This will happen to all the enemies of Christ, but especially to the Jews (whom He has particularly in mind), as the obvious course of events also shows. The real issue is their word or speaking, that they teach against Christ, curse, condemn, and blaspheme Him, and would like to see Him destroyed. This is meant by: “They speak evil against My soul,” that is, against My life. They would like to see Me dead and destroyed, so much do they hate Me. But the God of My praise is not silent. He praises and elevates Him even more when they curse and condemn Him.

Here we all might well have cause to fear, especially all heretics and false teachers. For what Christ asks here applies also to them. When a person commits the error of substituting his own opinion for Christ’s in even one item, everything is gone, and the whole Christ is lost, as He Himself says in Matt. 5:18–19: “Whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches men so, shall be the least in heaven. For not an iota, not a dot, will pass away.”

Once such an opinion is set forth, men fall upon it; and it soaks like water into their body, like off into their bones and marrow, and it becomes their everyday garment. Then one side begins to anathematize the other, and each side regards the other side’s teaching as pure poison and a curse, but its own teaching as pure salvation and a blessing. We can see this happening now among our schismatics and papists. When this happens, everything is gone. The great mob is not converted. A few individuals, whom God elects, come back; but the rest remain in their curse and poison, as the Jews do, and treat it as something precious.

That is what this psalm means when it says that all the enemies of Christ love to curse and do not like blessing, and that they do not change. Therefore St. Paul also says in Titus 3:10–11 that one should have nothing to do with a factious man after admonishing him twice, for he is perverted. I have never read of false teachers and instigators of heresy being converted. They remain obdurate in their own opinions. The oil has soaked into their marrow and bone; the water has become flesh and blood, part of their nature. They will not listen or discuss. This is the sin against the Holy Spirit, which cannot be forgiven. It will not repent or be sorry, but will only defend and excuse itself, as though it were something holy and precious and as though the Gospel which opposes it were something demonic.

The Four Psalms of Comfort

Psalm 109

Translated by
Jaroslav Pelikan

Luther’s works, vol. 14:
Selected Psalms III
p 271-272